Using Sumdog to Improve Math Skills and Student Motivation

One of the sites that I used in my Teacher Inquiry project over the summer was one I have mentioned before: Sumdog. I happen to love the site and have been using it again this year with my current students. My results from my teacher inquiry indicate that using Math sites such as Sumdog have a positive effect on students’ attitudes toward Math and motivation to do Math. The results also indicated that regularly using a site like Sumdog can result in improvement in accuracy and speed in the skills that they practice.

I have been using Sumdog for the last four or five years and the site underwent some major changes over the summer to streamline it, making it even more user-friendly. I use the site to assign weekly homework and an assessment to my students. I am able to customize skills for students easily and get real-time results of my students’ progress. I sent out a mass email at the beginning of the year to ensure that all parents were aware of the homework I was assigning (since you need technology to complete the tasks). Students also have the option of completing their work at lunch or after school in the computer lab. So far, I have had a mostly positive response from parents and students on this homework. As a teacher, I really like that it is so easy to assign tasks, but also that the site gives me so much data on student performance. I can even see problems that students get incorrect when I give an assessment, in addition to their final score.

 

Improving Math Skills with Sumdog

If you haven’t used Sumdog with your students – check it out! I have used lots of different Math sites, but this is the one I go back to year after year. The kids enjoy it – which is the most important thing to me. Kids can play against the computer, the world or even against kids in their own class. They can earn little rewards – pets, for example – as they get more and more points. This is new this school year, but even my grade eight and nines are getting a kick out of their new pets and the tricks that they can do. As the teacher, I can assign competitions, assessments, and challenges easily and track data from each. The site is appropriate for grades 1-9, with a wide selection of skills from which to choose. Differentiation is super simple and a huge benefit of the site, as I want different students to work on different skills. Anyhow, I like to share this site each school year because it is one of my favorites! 

What are your favorite Math sites? 

Elora of Stone

About krystalmills

I am a Grade 7 teacher in Prince Edward Island. Lessons From The Middle shares lessons from the classroom, and occasionally from my life as a mom of two young boys. The goal of this Canadian teacher blog is to share middle school lessons, activities and ideas from my classroom and to collaborate with the wonderful online community of teachers out there as well! Thanks for stopping by!   Find me on Facebook Twitter Pinterest Browse my TPT Store Browse my TN Store

Posted on November 1, 2015, in Differentiated instruction, Education, Math, Middle School, Technology and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. We just finished a county wide competition at our school and had great participation with 8 of the top ten students coming from our school. It is a fun way to practice math. To access all the options you talked about, do you have a license or subscription?

    • That’s so cool! I have just set up class competitions so far.

      I do have subscriptions for my students. However, I have had used the free accounts as well and they have quite a few options. The subscriptions aren’t terribly expensive, compared to other sites I’ve researched.

  2. I’m in the education program at my local university, and this looks like a really cool site to help students with math. This is something I hope to use when I finally have a classroom of my own!

  3. I am a teacher candidate from the Cowichan Valley in British Colombia. I am getting ready for a 5 week practicum with my grade 7 class. I can see how this can help students transform their relationship with math to become positive. Thank you for sharing.