Category Archives: Master’s of Education

Teacher Inquiry: My Wondering (Post 2)

I spoke in my previous post about teacher inquiry as a process in which teachers use their own skills, power, and creativity to solve a problem that exists in their classroom; a problem that if solved would improve student achievement in some way. I challenged you to state a wondering of your own, as well. This wondering should be something that you’re passionate about finding an answer to!

(Click here to read the introductory post….) 

 

 

Teacher Inquiry

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My wondering for my Master’s course requirement came at the end of this past school year. I had many different wonderings floating around in my head at the time. They dealt with whole class instruction, engagement,  behavior, and other issues as well. The process of defining a wondering is key because it is this question which will drive the entire inquiry. Since it was the end of the school year and I was not going to have my students in front of me during the inquiry, I identified an inquiry that I could explore in the summer months.

As a Math teacher, one issue arises for me each September. Students come back from a summer of rest and relaxation, and I am so happy to see them! Unfortunately, I find that many students tend to regress in their skills and we spend the first couple of weeks of school bringing them back up to speed. I wish I was able to start the grade level curriculum more quickly, and so I started to wonder… I wondered if there was a way to work with students over the summer to help maintain their math skills to lessen this regression. My students and I were also participating in a technology pilot at the time, which ended up having a significant impact on how I organized my inquiry. When it came down to defining my wondering, I knew I wanted to follow my passion for Math, and try to incorporate technology and attempt to increase or at least maintain student achievement.

My wondering for my inquiry was: How can I use technology (Khan Academy, Sumdog and Google Classroom) to help my grade 7 students maintain their Math skills over the summer months? 

In upcoming posts, I will discuss where I went from here with my teacher inquiry. So, any wonderings coming to mind? Please share by commenting below! I know many are already back in classrooms, although I do not personally start back with students until September 8th. I wonder…could we ever create an online group of teacher inquirers this school year? Any interest – please let me know and we’ll see what we can do!

Teacher inquiry

Do You Teach Your Students About Having a Fixed Vs Growth Mindset?

In one of the courses that I am taking for my Master’s of Education, I came across a topic that really struck a chord with me. I am taking two courses at the moment ( my March “Break” has been pivotal in maintaining my sanity with this 2 courses at once, business). In my Differentiated Instruction course, the idea of a “Fixed Mindset” versus a “Growth Mindset” came up. To put it simply, some people (kids included) believe that we are born with a certain amount of intelligence – it’s “fixed”. In comparison, hose with a “Growth Mindset” understand that putting in effort to learn new things expands our minds, and that effort is what makes us successful and “smarter”.

I don’t know about you, but I have certain students, who constantly question themselves and do not give their full effort! Like, ever! Oh wait, unless it’s a really simple task. It is extremely frustrating, as the teacher, to sit back and see that if s/he just TRIED they would achieve the success that they wish for. What I have learned is that people with a “fixed mindset” see effort and “having to try” as threatening to their intelligence. This exertion of effort actually makes them feel stupid because they feel like they should already know the material. They think that others just “get it” while they do not. Kids with a “fixed mindset” don’t realize that other students are actually working harder than they are (exerting effort to do well) and it is the effort of these other students that causes them to gain more academic success, not intelligence that they were born with.

I teach grade 7 and I think that junior high students could really benefit from being informed about “fixed” and “growth” mindsets. Recognizing the type of mindset that they have and looking at how they can make simple changes to actually “grow their brains” and make themselves smarter? I would have to think that idea would be appealing to kids!

I found an interactive quiz to share with your kiddos if this is something that you’re interested in. Below the quiz are two videos – a Ted Talk by Carol Dweck who has researched this phenomenon, and a second video about how the brain works that would be suitable for middle school and up. I also found another quick video comparing “fixed” and “growth” mindset.

Carol Dweck’s book is titled, “Mindset” if this is a topic that interests you.

I also dug around and found “Mindsets in the Classroom” which I am adding to my Amazon wishlist. It looks fantastic and very user-friendly!

          

I think that the main thing that I got from the articles that I have read for my MSED on mindset, is that kids need to know that they have the power to “make themselves smarter”. Their effort is what matters – they haven’t been born with a certain amount of intelligence. Exerting effort to learn something new makes the neurons in their brain fire and can actually cause their brain to grow (whereby making them smarter than if they hadn’t exerted effort). Even sharing or reminding kids of that fact, and pulling the topic in when kids with “fixed mindsets” balk at challenges would be helpful with motivating and inspiring all kids to achieve.

I am excited to get back to class and share some of the things I have learned about mindset with my kiddos (the ones with clearly “fixed mindsets” especially). I would love to hear your opinions on this topic! Are you familiar with Dweck’s work? I have spoken to my kids on the topic of effort, but never in the terms of mindset and intelligence and I can’t wait to hear what they think!

Virtual Field Trip to Africa

Master’s Update and Math Apps!

I have been working really hard this year to try to differentiate a bit more effectively for my students. Last year I looked into Guided Math, and although I loved the way it sounded, I know that I fell short of actually following through with my well-intended plan. As part of a Master’s assignment this year, I actively started incorporating more small group time for guided practice into my classroom. Honestly, I can already feel the shift. The things that I thought would happen (a bunch of hands up in the air as I try to help those in the group) haven’t really been an issue, yet. Those who need help are with me and those who do not are able to move along and complete their work. It’s actually kind of simple. I also established some anchor activities for students to choose from when they do complete their work. I haven’t worked out all of the kinks, but knowing that I’m going to get to more students more quickly makes me feel as though I am teaching more authentically! If you don’t do much “guided practice” after your initial lesson, try it! For a week or two, try to build in more time to work with students in a small group. And keep it simple! Right now, I have it established that after my mini-lesson anyone who feels that they would like to work through a few more examples can join me at the back table. The students CHOOSE to come. What I love MOST is when the students who choose to join are the ones whom I was worried would be acting up and making it difficult for me to teach. They are CHOOSING to come back and work through examples with me. I still have a few students that I’d like to see join me at the back, however, I will give them time to decide if they need my help or not. If they should be going through more examples with me, I will ask them to join the group as well. I’m playing this part by ear, so far. What I’m also really happy about, is that my small group time has been with many different students. Initially I was scared that there may be a negative stigma attached to coming to the small group for more guided practice. However, this has not been the case. This small change to my teaching practice this year has been amazing and I’m looking forward to really harnessing the power of small group instruction.

As a part of this week’s assignment for my course I found a great blog post on Math Puzzle Apps and another on Incorporating Games into the Classroom . Math games and puzzles are simple options to use as anchor activities for students when they have finished the assigned work for the day. They keep the kids engaged while you can continue to work with those students who need your help.

I haven’t checked out all of the Math Apps in the article yet, but it’s on my to-do list for later this week!

Do you have any great Math Apps for middle school that don’t require internet? Please share if you do! I’m always on the lookout!

 

 

A New Chapter…Master’s of Education

I’ve been thinking about it off and on for the last 4 or 5 years and the timing was just never right. Well, I have jumped in and am very proud to announce that I’ll be beginning my Master’s of Education on September 2nd. That also happens to be my first day back at school. Gulp. And to complicate things further, it happens to be our first year in a new/renovated K-12 building. I haven’t been in the school yet this summer (usually my classroom would be half set up by now) because the school (including my classroom) is not yet finished! Double gulp? I know what you’re saying, and THIS is good timing? No, not really. But, what I have decided is that there will never be a perfect time. That, I know for sure.

I have no idea what all of this means for my blogging life – I’m hoping that it’s not over, but I know that my full time job as a grade 7 and 8 teacher and my course work commitments are going to pretty intense. Only time will tell, I guess!

So, a little bit about my program, it’s completely online through Walden University. It’s an accelerated program and I’ll complete it in 16 months! Yay! I’ll be done next Christmas – that’s pretty amazing to me! Finally, it’s a Master’s of Science Education in Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment (K-12). The courses sound awesome, practical and like I’ll actually be able to use my course work to enhance the achievement of my students “in real time” not just in theory or down the road. There are courses on designing curriculum for learning, differentiating instruction, assessment, teaching students with learning disabilities, and motivating students -among other things. I truly am excited to be starting this journey! So, if I happen to drop off the face of the blogging planet – you’ll know where I am, and I will be back. Wish me luck!

A New Chapter...Starting my Master's Of Education

Anyone who’s been thinking about a Master’s program – just apply. Don’t wait for a perfect time – it’ll never happen. Just take the plunge. You’ll never finish if you don’t first begin! So take the steps to begin! If you want any information on the program or school that I have chosen, just comment below and we can have a chat. They have made the process so easy for me and I can’t wait to get going on my journey. I’m really glad that I’ve taken this first step.

 

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