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Helping Middle Schoolers Avoid the Summer Slide

~Happy to have another blog post from guest blogger Catherine Ross. Summer slide. How can our kids avoid it?~

summer slide

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Every summer, an evil monster waits in the dark looking for its next victim – a young mind ready to stay idle for over three months. What evil monster? Why, the dreaded Summer Slide indeed! Children lose mammoth educational ground during their summer breaks because they are away from regular studies for a long time. Summer slide affects middle school children the most as they are in the most crucial phase of their education – the middle school years not only help kids discover their favorite subjects and areas of interest, but also help them set the foundation for advanced studies. While parents get busy planning family holidays as soon as summer sets in, ensuring that the learning doesn’t stop sometimes takes a backseat. So how can summer slide be tackled among middle school children while simultaneously making the most of the sunny, breezy season? Below are a few ways to make learning seem like a game and prevent summer slide in middle school children.

Setting goals

summer slide

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Middle school children must understand that it is important to stay connected to their last year’s syllabus. What they’ll learn in the next grade will build upon what they learnt in their previous grade. So it’s essential to know their last year’s math, science, and grammar syllabi. Set goals with your middle school child and try to make the learning experience fun. Examples: solve 100 math problems in a week, read four short stories in two days, conduct three science experiments in 5 weekdays, etc. The time limits will make it challenging for a middle school child to achieve the goals and eventually help in preventing the inevitable slide.

Practicing

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Setting a goal of reading four short stories in two days doesn’t necessarily translate into reading four short stories in one day. Or, solving 100 problems in a week doesn’t mean the middle schooler will solve 50 on the last day of achieving the goal. The whole objective of ‘setting goals’ is to ensure that the middle schoolers continue to practice their lessons through the break. So oversee your child’s daily routine and make sure she plans out the tasks sensibly. If a child has to read four short stories in two days, she should ideally read two a day, and solving 100 problems in a week will mean solving 14 a day on an average. When your child gets bored of solving problems and reading stories, switch to fun games for kids online that are both educational as well as fun.

Rewarding

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Plan mid-summer rewards for kids on successfully achieving their goals. Why would they want to complete the tasks assigned to them within a limited time if there’s nothing waiting at the end of it for them? But avoid rewarding them with very fancy gifts and instead choose books, stationery, puzzles, board games, etc. In other words, choose rewards that have an educational value.

Going out

summer slide

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There’s another objective to summer besides trying and avoiding summer slide – enjoying summer! Museums, nature parks, and zoos never cease to teach us. Take kids out to these destinations and give them a chance to explore beyond their textbooks. Incorporate learning cleverly into these trips by studying maps of the places you explored, going back home and writing essays on the trip, documenting the trips to make a journal on their summer holiday, and more. After all, summers are meant to be outdoorsy!

Don’t forget to enjoy the sun while trying hard to avoid summer slide. Play while learning and learn while playing to make the most of both.

 

Author Bio:

Catherine Ross is a full-time stay-at-home-mum who believes learning should be enjoyable for young minds. An erstwhile elementary school teacher, Catherine loves coming up with creative ways through which kids can grasp the seemingly difficult concepts of learning easily. She believes that a ‘fun factor’ can go a long way in enhancing kids’ understanding and blogs at http://kidslearninggames.weebly.com/